Madame Chiang, 105, Chinese Leader's Widow, Dies
By SETH FAISON/New York Times Published: October 24, 2003

http://www.nytimes.com/2003/10/25/international/25CHIA.html?pagewanted=4

Madame Chiang Kai-shek, a pivotal player in one of the 20th century's great epics - the struggle for control of post-imperial China waged between the Nationalists and the Communists during the Japanese invasion and the violent aftermath of World War II - died on Thursday in New York City, the Foreign Ministry of Taiwan reported early Friday. She was 105 years old.

Madame Chiang, a dazzling and imperious politician, wielded immense influence in Nationalist China, but she and her husband were eventually forced by the Communist victory into exile in Taiwan, where she presided as the grand dame of Nationalist politics for many years. After Chiang Kai-shek died in 1975, Madame Chiang retreated to New York City, where she lived out her last quarter-century.

Madame Chiang was the most famous member of one of modern China's most remarkable families, the Soongs, who dominated Chinese politics and finance in the first half of the century. Yet in China it was her American background and lifestyle that distinguished Soong Mei-ling, her maiden name (which is sometimes spelled May-ling).

For many Americans, Madame Chiang's finest moment came in 1943, when she barnstormed the United States in search of support for the Nationalist cause against Japan, winning donations from countless Americans who were mesmerized by her passion, determination and striking good looks. Her address to a joint meeting of Congress electrified Washington, winning billions of dollars in aid.

Madame Chiang helped craft American policy toward China during the war years, running the Nationalist Government's propaganda operation and emerging as its most important diplomat. Yet she was also deeply involved in the endless maneuverings of her husband, Chiang Kai-shek, who was uneasily at the helm of several shifting alliances with Chinese warlords vying for control of what was then a badly fractured nation.

A devout Christian, Madame Chiang spoke fluent English tinted with the Southern accent she acquired as a school girl in Georgia, and presented a civilized and humane image of a courageous China battling a Japanese invasion and Communist subversion. Yet historians have documented the murderous path that Chiang Kai-shek led in his efforts to win, then keep, and ultimately lose power. It also became clear in later years that the Chiang family had pocketed hundreds of millions of dollars of American aid intended for the war. (譯﹕在後期清晰地發現蔣家將數以美元億計的美戰爭援款中飽私囊)

Madame Chiang had a notoriously tempestuous relationship with her husband, and then with his son by a previous marriage, Chiang Ching-kuo, who became Taiwan's leader after Chiang Kai-shek's death. Madame Chiang had no children.

Her skill as a politician, alternately charming and vicious, made her a formidable presence. She made a play for Taiwan's leadership after Chiang Ching-kuo died in 1988, even though she was 90 and living in New York at the time.

Although she suffered numerous ailments, including breast cancer, Madame Chiang eventually outlived all her contemporary rivals. She was said to credit her religious faith - she told friends she rose at dawn for an hour of prayer each day - for her good health.

Gen. Joseph W. Stilwell, who worked closely with her when he commanded American forces in China during the war, described Madame Chiang in his diary as a "clever, brainy woman." "Direct, forceful, energetic. Loves power, eats up publicity and flattery, pretty weak on her history. Can turn on charm at will and knows it."

Love of Money, Power and China

Soong Mei-ling's rise to power began when she married Chiang Kai-shek in an opulent ceremony in Shanghai in 1927, bringing together China's star military man with one of the nation's most illustrious families.

Her eldest sister, Soong Ai-ling, directed the family's affairs and innumerable money-making ventures with the help of her husband, H.H. Kung, a scion of one of China's wealthiest banking families.

Madame Chiang's second sister, Soong Qing-ling, was the wife of Sun Yat-sen, China's first president after the last emperor was toppled in 1911. After Sun Yat-sen's death, Soong Qing-ling carried his banner over into the Communist camp, causing an irreparable rupture in the family.

When the vanquished Nationalists retreated to Taiwan in 1949, Soong Qing-ling stayed behind. The Communist Party leadership called her the only true patriot in the Soong family, and named her honorary chairman of the People's Republic in 1980, a year before her death.

Today, Chinese still remember the three sisters with a telling ditty: "One loved money, one loved power, one loved China," referring to Ai-ling, Mei-ling and Qing-ling.

Madame Chiang's elder brother, T.V. Soong, often called Nationalist China's financial wizard, served at various times as China's finance minister, acting prime minister and foreign minister, where his primary role was raising money from the United States.

Although Madame Chiang developed a stellar image with the American public, President Franklin D. Roosevelt and other leaders became disillusioned with her and her husband's despotic and corrupt practices. Eleanor Roosevelt was shocked at Madame Chiang's answer when asked at a dinner at the White House how the Chinese Government would handle a strike by coal miners. Madame Chiang silently drew a sharp fingernail across her neck. "She can talk beautifully about democracy," Mrs. Roosevelt said later. "But she does not know how to live democracy." (﹕雖然蔣夫人在美國公開場合中建立了明星形象可是羅斯福總統及其他領袖對她及她丈夫的專橫暴虐及貪汙感到失望。最讓依蓮諾羅斯福(總統夫人)震驚的是:在白宮晚宴時她被問到中國政府會如何處理煤礦工人罷工時蔣夫人靜靜地用她的尖指甲自自己脖子劃過。羅斯福夫人事後說:“她可以把民主說的美好但不知如何將民主履行在己身”

By the end of the war, the loyalty of Nationalist officials melted away as the Government grew corrupt and fiscally traitorous, printing money so aggressively that the Chinese currency fell to an exchange rate of several million yuan to the dollar. Many Nationalist soldiers were reduced to begging for food because they went unpaid, yet American diplomats discovered that military supplies sent from the United States to China sometimes appeared on the black market soon after arrival._ (﹕很多國民黨士兵沒薪水可發導致向民間乞討食物。可是美外交人員卻有時發現美援軍用物資在運抵不久後出現在黑市)

Even at the busiest times of war, Madame Chiang often left her husband and disappeared into seclusion in New York for months at a time. The Chiang camp was too secretive to deny rumors about marital troubles, but Madame Chiang's retreats may also have been caused by a debilitating skin condition.

During the 1950's, Madame Chiang and her husband blamed the United States for the Nationalist loss of China, and continued to campaign for help from Washington to retake the mainland. Although that hope eventually faded, American support for Taiwan remained strong for years, delaying Washington's recognition of Beijing as the capital of China until 1979, three decades after the Communists had seized power.

By then, Madame Chiang had moved to New York, where she lived in an apartment on Gracie Square in Manhattan. In March 1999, as she turned 101, hard of hearing but still quick-witted, she told visitors that she read the Bible and The New York Times every day. gfobsubhdA Family's DivisionsReflect a Nation's

The Soong family's saga, a story that cuts across many strands of modern Chinese history, began when Madame Chiang's father, Charlie Soong, sailed to the United States at the age of 12. Coming from a family of traders in Hainan Island in the South China Sea, Mr. Soong was taken in by Methodists in North Carolina and converted to Christianity in hopes of sending him back to spread the word of Jesus in China.

After returning to Shanghai in 1886, Mr. Soong, a genial wheeler-dealer, passed up missionary life to start a business printing Bibles, earning a fortune. He also printed political pamphlets secretly for Sun Yat-sen, then working to overthrow China's last emperor. On Jan. 1, 1912, Sun was named China's first president.

Sun lasted in office only a few months before his coalition disintegrated, and after he fled to Japan, he hired Charlie Soong's second daughter, Soong Qing-ling, as a secretary. They soon married, despite the age difference: he was 50 and she was 21.

At the time Mei-ling Soong, who was born in Shanghai in 1898, was already studying in the United States. At the age of 10, she had followed her elder sisters to the Wesleyan College for Women in Macon, Ga.

She entered Wellesley College near Boston in 1913; her brother, T.V., was enrolled at Harvard. She majored in English literature, and was remembered by her classmates as a chubby, vivacious and determined student. She graduated in 1917 and returned to Shanghai speaking English better than Chinese.

She was introduced to her future husband in 1922. By that time, she had matured into a slender beauty and taken to wearing full-length body-hugging gowns.

Chiang Kai-shek, a severe-looking military aide to Sun Yat-sen who established a school for officers in southern China, may have been as attracted to the Soongs' financial and political connections as he was to their youngest daughter. His initial overtures to her were rebuffed, and after Sun's death in 1925, as Chiang Kai-shek took the title Generalissimo and tried to succeed him as the leader of the Nationalist cause, he proposed to Sun's young widow, Soong Qing-ling. She said no.

General Chiang allied himself with warlords in southern and central China and with the Soviet Union, where Stalin regarded the Nationalists as more progressive than the warlords who still controlled Beijing and northern China. Communist rebels, not yet led by Mao Zedong, felt they deserved Moscow's support. But Stalin insisted on supporting the Nationalists.

In 1927 General Chiang shocked his Soviet backers by carrying out a massacre of leftists in Shanghai. Edgar Snow, the American journalist, estimated that General Chiang's forces executed more than 5,000 people. (編註:指1927年清黨在上海屠殺五千余人)

The massacre caused a permanent rent in the Soong family. Soong Qing-ling, as Sun Yat-sen's widow, led a faction of Nationalists who voted to expel General Chiang from all his posts. T.V. Soong resigned as finance minister, though he was later persuaded to resume his alliance with General Chiang.

General Chiang also allied himself with Shanghai's notorious underworld, then led by an opium-dealing gangster named Du Yuesheng, widely known as Big-Eared Du. In a fractious city, separated into sectors run by competing foreign powers, Du was the most powerful man, dominating banking, smuggling and opium. (編註:蔣與上海惡名昭彰的流氓頭杜月笙結盟。杜控制了上海金融從事走私販毒)

A Suitable Husband and Dubious Friends

When General Chiang renewed his interest in Soong Mei-ling in 1927, she told him that she would consent to marry only if he could win the approval of her mother, who had reservations about a man who was neither Christian nor single. General Chiang had already fathered a son in a marriage that was arranged when he was only 14, and had adopted a second son and married a second wife, Chen Chieh-ru. General Chiang promised to convert, and eventually sent Chen away to the United States, where she enrolled at Columbia University and earned a doctorate.

The Chiang-Soong wedding took place in Shanghai on Dec. 1, 1927. A small Christian ceremony was held at the Soong mansion on Seymour Road, followed by a political ceremony at the Majestic Hotel, beneath a portrait of Sun Yat-sen.

According to the North China News, the event was a highlight of Shanghai's social calendar, attended by more than 1,300 of the cosmopolitan city's elite. A photograph shows Chiang Kai-shek in a morning suit, with a thin stubble of hair on his head. Madame Chiang looks like a 1920's coquette, with a white lace veil crawling down her forehead to her eyebrows.

Madame Chiang became a true political partner to her husband, traveling with him, advising him on military and political matters, turning her charm on allies and foes alike. Chiang spoke almost no English, though his wife taught him to call her "darling," and she served as his interpreter, often interspersing her own views.

However, she was continually reminded of the limits of the general's authority. Ilona Ralf Sues, a Polish journalist who worked briefly for Madame Chiang and later wrote "Shark Fins and Millet," documenting the treacherous politics of Shanghai, described how Madame Chiang was kidnapped by "Big-Eared Du" after she tried to convince her husband that as the leader of the Nationalists, he no longer needed to pay protection money to Du's underworld operation, the Green Gang.

Madame Chiang went out shopping in her limousine one afternoon, and did not return home by evening. When Du was reached on the phone, he said that Madame Chiang was fine, but that she had been found motoring alone in the streets of Shanghai, "a very imprudent thing to do considering the ever-present hazards." Money changed hands, and Madame Chiang was henceforth cautious with the Green Gang.

Madame Chiang's highly political life was often lonely, according to Ms. Sues. "She had admirers, but no true friends," she wrote of Madame Chiang in 1944. "She wants to be First Lady of the World."

Madame Chiang developed what she called the New Life Movement, a series of principles for modernizing China through social discipline, courtesy and service. She engineered public hygiene campaigns and denounced traditional superstitions.

While many ordinary Chinese resisted it, the campaign was popular with foreigners, particularly with Henry Luce, the publisher of Time, who was born to missionaries in China. He named the couple "Man and Woman of the Year" in 1938.

Madame Chiang pushed her husband to build up the Nationalist air force, and helped hire Claire Chennault, who commanded a mercenary force of pilots that came to be known as the Flying Tigers.

Madame Chiang also helped defuse one of the gravest crises of her husband's career, when he was kidnapped by rebellious generals in December 1936 in what came to be known as the Xian Incident.

Their rebels' leader, Gen. Zhang Xueliang, had long advocated better efforts at fighting the Japanese, who had gained control of Manchuria in 1931 and continued to make inroads in northern China, and criticized General Chiang's preoccupation with the Chinese Communist forces then based in China's northwest.

When General Chiang refused to redirect his military focus, General Zhang engineered a kidnapping at dawn on Dec. 4 at a hot springs resort where General Chiang was camped. General Chiang tried to escape in his nightclothes, badly injured his back scaling a back wall, and was found hours later, cowering and shivering between some rocks up a hill, minus his false teeth.

General Chiang refused to negotiate with his captors. Yet as Madame Chiang deliberated with other Nationalist leaders in the capital, Nanjing, it became apparent that some of General Chiang's rivals were advocating a military strike that could end in General Chiang's death. Madame Chiang flew to Xian to help mediate.

Communist leaders were also called in, and they were split over whether to execute General Chiang or to follow Stalin's instructions to unite with the Nationalists against the Japanese. Weeks of murky negotiations ensued. Finally, after T.V. Soong authorized a large payment to insure General Chiang's release, an agreement was reached on Dec. 31.

Retribution against General Zhang was swift and lasted a lifetime. General Chiang placed him under house arrest, where he was kept, on the Chinese mainland and then in Taiwan, until he was in his 90's. He later moved to Hawaii, where he remained until his death in 2001.

編註:西安事變結束後護蔣飛返南京的張學良遭蔣軟禁。一禁54年(1936~1990)直到蔣子經國逝世在李登輝總統影響下張學良逐漸獲得人身自由。那時英姿煥發的少帥已成89歲步履維艱的老人但他比西安事變另一主角楊虎城將軍的下場好多了。在重慶失守前,下野退居溪口的“一介平民”蔣先生不顧“代總統李宗仁”釋放楊虎城的命令﹐讓特務頭子毛人鳳下令其親信周養浩執行重慶地區殺人任務,其中包括了在“戴公祠”謀害楊虎城一案。參加屠殺的特務凶手有張鵲、張靜甫、陳寶琪等二十多人﹐他們手刃楊將軍﹑其十七八歲兒子拯中﹑以及楊氏秘書宋綺云夫婦與他們未滿十歲的兩個孩子。附特務沈醉口述《蔣介石殘殺楊、宋經過》於後)

Diva-Like Petulance and a Winning Way

During the war, the relationship among General Stilwell, Madame Chiang and Chiang Kai-shek proved contentious. Stilwell accused General Chiang of hoarding resources, deliberately avoiding battle with the Japanese to spare his men to fight the Communists.

Madame Chiang was in the middle, sometimes interceding on Stilwell's behalf when resisting him threatened American support. But she also plotted against Stilwell, telling journalists that he was incompetent. She and her husband lobbied Washington to have Stilwell replaced, and he was, in 1944.

Madame Chiang also emerged as China's most important ambassador, frequently charming American visitors like Wendell Willkie, the Republican politician, who came to China in 1942 after losing a presidential campaign against Roosevelt in 1940.

"There is little doubt that Little Sister has accomplished one of her easiest conquests," wrote John Paton Davies, an American diplomat, apparently referring to the way Madame Chiang took advantage of Mr. Willkie's lack of access to women in wartime China. "It's interesting the influence which enforced celibacy has on his judgment - and the course of political events."

According to Sterling Seagrave, who wrote a scathing portrait of Madame Chiang in his racy history, "The Soong Dynasty," she was also capable of diva-like petulance. Madame Chiang was in New York in 1943 when she learned that Winston Churchill was on his way to Washington. She suggested that the British Prime Minister stop in New York to see her. He responded that she should join him for lunch with Roosevelt in Washington.

Churchill recalled with some amusement in his history of the war that she turned him down "with some hauteur." "In the regrettable absence of Madame Chiang Kai-shek, the President and I lunched alone in his room and made the best of things," he wrote.

Madame Chiang made a splash in Washington soon afterward. She spoke forcefully and passionately to Congress, winning a roaring ovation. She then traveled across the country, appearing at Madison Square Garden and at the Hollywood Bowl.

But she earned the enmity of American G.I.'s when she returned to China's wartime capital, Chungking, with several suitcases, one of which plopped open to reveal luxurious cosmetics, lingerie and fancy groceries.

It was a small sign of the growing corruption within the Nationalists that would speed their undoing. After Japan was defeated in 1945 and the civil war between Nationalists and Communists accelerated, the Communists swiftly expanded their control into the northeast.

The Nationalists received considerable American aid, but as John Service, a longtime Foreign Service officer in China, warned in a memorandum about General Chiang: "He has achieved and maintained his position in China by his supreme skill in balancing man against man and group against group, and his adroitness as a military politician rather than as a military commander, and by reliance on a gangster secret police."

Other American officials in China also warned against the vast amounts of graft among Nationalists. More than $3 billion was appropriated to China during the war, and most of it was transmitted through T.V. Soong, who as China's foreign minister was based in Washington. It later became apparent that the Soong family suffered vicious infighting over the purloined funds. 譯:其他美駐華官員警告美政府大量(抗戰)援助款被國民黨挪用。抗戰期間援華超過30億美元﹐大部份援助是款經過駐華盛頓DC的外長宋子文轉交中國。後來察覺宋家內部顯然地為盜竊的款項展開激烈內鬥。編註:當中國像乞丐般的軍民在浴血國家面臨存亡之際﹐錦衣玉食呼風喚雨的他們居然還中截活命款厚顏發戰爭財。這不叫“國賊”﹐誰叫!)。.

Madame Chiang traveled to Washington again in November 1948 to plead for emergency aid for the war against the Communists. Yet Congress had recently assigned another $1 billion to China, and President Truman was impatient with the Chiangs and what had become an apparently hopeless effort to shore up the Nationalist Government. Madame Chiang never returned to China.

"I can ask the American people for nothing more," she said. "It is either in your hearts to love us, or your hearts have been turned from us."

In her frustration, she publicly likened American politics to 'clodhopping boorishness." Coming after years of generous American support, that irritated Truman.

"They're thieves, every damn one of them," Mr. Truman said later, referring to Nationalist leaders. "They stole $750 million out of the billions that we sent to Chiang. They stole it, and it's invested in real estate down in SÄao Paolo and some right here in New York."
杜魯門總統後來指國民黨領導們說:“他們是賊﹐每個都是!”﹐“從他們我們援助蔣的億計款項中偷了七億五千萬投資到聖保羅(巴西)及這兒紐約的房地產”編註﹕三十年前我在紐約居住時便耳聞蔣夫人在曼哈頓黃金地段擁有大樓的傳說。)

 


General Chiang resigned as president of Nationalist China in January 1949 and fled to Taiwan that May, taking with him a national art collection that was kept in crates in Taiwan for years as the Chiangs clung to the ever-diminishing hope that they would some day take it back to Beijing.

In the United States, the Chiangs set up what would become one of the most sophisticated lobbying efforts ever in Washington, learning how to distribute millions of dollars indirectly through law firms and public relations companies. The operation continues today.

Madame Chiang made several trips to the United States in the 1950's to oppose efforts by the People's Republic of China to win a seat at the United Nations. Only in 1971 did the United Nations allow the government of the world's most populous country to be represented, a prelude to President Nixon's trip to Beijing in 1972.

After Nixon met Jiang Qing, a radical leftist who was Mao's wife, he wrote that she seemed the opposite of Madame Chiang: severe on the outside, but weak within; Madame Chiang had a soft appearance, but was steely inside.

Madame Chiang's health wavered over the years, and in 1976 she was diagnosed with breast cancer and had a mastectomy, and later, a second one.

Even after she moved to permanent residence in New York after Chiang Kai-shek's death in 1975, Madame Chiang kept her finger on the pulse of Nationalist politics. She returned to Taiwan after her stepson died in January 1988. Even though she was nearly 90, Madame Chiang tried to rally her old allies. But Lee Teng-hui, chosen as vice president both because he was Taiwan-born and because he was considered a pushover by fellow Nationalists, proved more adept at politics than expected, and he gradually solidified his control.

Madame Chiang lived out her final years in New York, with a pack of black-suited bodyguards who cleared the lobby of her Gracie Square apartment building every time she entered or left. She returned to Congress for one last appearance in 1995. ﹕蔣夫人晚年與一群黑西裝護衛住在紐約每當她進出Gracie_Square公寓大廳時他們都將大廳清場。她最後去國會是在1005年)

Her life gradually grew quiet, as friends preceded her to the grave. She stopped visiting a family estate on Long Island in Lattingtown, where she had often spent time with her younger relatives.
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獨裁者--略施的小惠請不要相信.!!!.

美國杜魯門總統說:蔣介石夫妻、蔣經國一家都是賊

獨裁者蔣家1949他把惡名昭彰的「軍統」、「中統」……等特務機關交給他的兒子 蔣經國 「重整」,任命為「總統府機要室資料組」組長;成了名符其實的「特務頭子」。

蔣經國─開始有名的「白色恐怖」(其實就是中國人慣用的「清鄉」行動),屠殺逃到台灣的中國人(寧願錯殺一百,也不願放過一個共黨份子)。這和稍早的二二八事件不同,二二八殺的都是台灣菁英…。

持續四十年「戒嚴」統治,絕對是蔣經國主導的(特別是「副總裁」陳誠 去逝以後)。

由國防部長、副行政院長、行政院長,最後幹上總統;

還搖身一變,「扮成」上山下海,親民愛民的統治者。這種「身段」迷暈許許多多台灣蠢蛋;並且成為後來一些「奸巧」政客模仿的對象

這期間,他搞了幾次婚外情(他從不缺少「紅粉知己」);最有名的是和財政部長 任顯群 爭奪國劇名伶 顧正秋;失敗後「公報私仇」,把 任顯群 關起來,罪名就是他一貫愛用的「知匪不報」。

他還妄想把大位傳給兒子 蔣孝武。等到捅了「江南案」的大漏子,才了解:他的兒子個個是「阿斗」(兩個私生子比較好一點),加上大環境的逼迫,使他諳然的說出:蔣家人士將不再繼任國家元首一職。

1990年,一批老賊(萬年國代)不甘心既得利益受損,鼓譟長期遭 蔣經國 壓抑的「弟弟」蔣緯國 出來競選總統(當然需要另一台灣蠢蛋搭擋)……。都是企圖延長「寄生」在台灣的「蔣記政權」。

一波接依波「美麗島事件」標示出,時代不一樣了;台灣怎麼能永遠是他 蔣 家的禁臠?「皇帝式的總統」也不能再存在了,這一點 蔣經國 心知肚明。而,他的健康也已經到了日薄西山的地步。

在民主人士的抗爭下,他只好將踩在人民脖子上的腳:解除戒嚴、開放探親……;使一些台灣蠢蛋感激涕零,進而歌功頌德,讚揚 蔣經國 為民主偉人──真是無知到了極點。

眼看社會上存在著被催眠、滿山滿谷的「台灣蠢蛋」,於是抬出小蔣的遺像,作為文宣重點;說 蔣經國 是他們由衷拜服的主子; 蔣經國不 是獨裁者……。

紐約時報引述1948年杜魯門總統的話:「他們是賊,該死的每一個人都是,美國給蔣介石的數十億美元,他們就偷了七億五千萬,他們偷了這筆錢投資在巴西的聖保羅,有一些也在紐約......」("They're thieves, every damn one of them," Mr. Truman said later, referring to Nationalist leaders. "They stole $750 million out of the billions that we sent to Chiang. They stole it, and it's invested in real estate down in SAao Paolo and some right here in New York.)

蔣宋美齡利用軍事資源,運送私人財物與用品,浪費得來不易的戰略資源,這些奢華貴族的氣焰,更是讓軍美國方與蔣介石之間關係緊張,二次大戰名將史迪威(J. Stil well)與蔣介石的衝突,也與此有很大關係。

紐約時報報導也指出,「......她激起美國軍人對她的嫌惡,尤其是她帶著許多皮箱回到重慶,打開其中一個,出現了奢侈的化妝品、私人衣物和昂貴日用品......」。該報認為,「見微知著,這是國民黨逐漸腐敗,迅速走向自我毀滅的警訊」(It was a small sign of the growing corruption within the Nationalists that would speed their undoing.)。

前美國總統杜魯門曾在著名的紐約時報說:國民黨蔣家政權一家都是賊掏空當時的美援到美國紐約巴西聖保羅置產如今他的徒子徒孫李慶安有樣學樣擁有美國人的身份卻欺騙違反中華民國的法律詐領中華民國政府的財產原來國民爛黨真是賊性難改ㄚ。

.......................................................................................................................

 評價蔣宋美齡的問題

【2003/11/3 / 民眾日報 / 政治】

陳水扁總統出國訪問,途經紐約,頒贈褒揚令,推崇蔣夫人「西安事變,蹈危履險,深入虎穴,厥績至偉出席開羅會議,確保我國領土完整」。根據台聯立委轉述,李登輝日前對於政府一度要在蔣宋美齡出殯日降半旗,也表示不以為然。他說,陳水扁總統如果隨便為蔣宋美齡降半旗,「可能會把支持度降下一、兩成!」。前後兩位總統對蔣宋美齡過世的態度很不一樣,陳總統遵循國家禮儀,而李前總統與宋美齡之間原本就有權力衝突的恩怨,以及卸任總統後在政治上率性為之,講出這種話也不令人意外。比起兩位總統的言談態度,蔣宋美齡的過世,其實有更嚴重而廣泛的對立。

宋美齡過世消息傳來,兩大報就大幅持續報導,聯合報系至十一月一日為止已經有二百三十三條有關新聞,而中時報系也有一百二十三則。充分顯現對蔣宋美齡的懷念。所有新聞幾乎都是正面的,更有許多是歌功頌德的。中時甚至發表「母儀天下的永恆典範_敬悼蔣夫人」的社論。母儀天下這種封建的用語竟然出現在二十一世紀民主時代的台灣,令人愕然。文中表示「光芒四射、輝耀中外,端在於她本人的出眾才華、超卓智慧、傑出能力和崇高信念,以及愛民族、愛國家的偉大情操。」似乎是戒嚴時期的文章。

有報紙在大幅報導之餘,還特別強調紐約時報連續大幅報蔣宋美齡的新聞,主要是要藉美國媒體加強對宋美齡的肯定。在編譯紐約時報相關新聞時,完全不提紐約時報蔣宋美齡負面的批評,這又似乎是戒嚴時期媒體報導的一貫手段。然而,如今台灣透過網路可以直接閱讀紐約時報,倒也突破戒嚴式的媒體封鎖。也有熱心人士,立即翻譯出其中重要的段落,竟然還真不少。

網路上流傳這些片斷的譯文,值得國內讀者在閱讀大量歌功頌德有關宋美齡的新聞時,也了解一些美國方面蔣宋美齡的負面評價。特擇發若幹則,供讀者參考。由於在網路上流通,無法徵得譯者同意,也在此致意。

網路傳遞的譯文標題是杜魯門:他們是賊,每一個都是賊」。

在譯文前有一段說明「紐約時報25日用了相當大的篇幅,以《蔣女士,中國領導人的寡婦,105歲死亡》為題,回顧蔣宋美齡的一生非常值得注意的事,整篇文章,從開始到結尾都不斷強調一件事,就是蔣宋美齡A了美國的錢,也清楚提及美國人對蔣宋美齡幻滅的過程。以下是部分譯出的段落:

--歷史學家們紀錄了蔣介石以殘殺手腕、贏取、保有,最終失去權力的過程。後來幾年,事情變得明朗化,蔣氏家庭A了好幾億用來支援中國抗日和打共產黨戰爭的美援。

--雖然蔣女士在美國的公眾輿論裡有一種明星般的形象,法蘭克福?羅斯福總統和其它領袖們,對她和她丈夫專制和腐敗的作為感到幻滅。羅斯福女士在一場白宮晚餐中,當問到蔣女士的中國政府如何處理煤礦工人罷工問題時,他所獲得的答案是令人感到驚恐的:蔣女士不發一語,用尖銳的指甲在她的脖子前比了一比。

「她可以把民主談得很漂亮,但是,她不知道如何生活在民主政治裡。」羅斯福女士事後說。

--即使在戰爭最緊張的時刻,蔣女士也經常離開她的丈夫,忽然消失在紐約幾個月,蔣幫因為太神秘而無能反駁有關他們婚姻的謠言,但是,蔣女士的自動消失,或許也肇因於她日益惡化的皮膚狀況。

--蔣女士很快的在華府引起風潮,她在國會強有力和熱情的演說,引起了如雷的掌聲,她然後橫越整個國家。但是,她同時卻引起了美國軍人對她的厭惡,尤其是她回到戰時的首都重慶,帶著許多箱的皮箱,其中一個撐開來,露出了裡面奢華的化妝品,私人衣物和時髦昂貴的日用品。

--蔣女士在1948年十月到華府來要錢打共產黨,但是,美國國會才通過對中國的十億援助,此時,杜魯門總統對蔣家夫婦已經非常沒有耐心,給蔣家錢對於支持國民民政府根本沒有一點幫助。蔣女士從此沒有再回到中國。

--蔣女士說:「我不會再向美國人要什麼了,要不是你們愛我們,要不就是你們的心已背離了我們。」

--「他們是賊,她們每一個人都是賊。」杜魯門指的是國民政府的領導人,「他們從我們送給蔣政府的上十億美金裡,偷取了將近七億五千萬美金。他們偷了這筆錢,而且將這筆錢投資在巴西的聖保羅,以及就在這裡,紐約的房地產。」

雖然有報紙以戒嚴心態大幅報導偉大的蔣宋美齡的光榮事跡,但是歷史會有更公正的評斷。這些片斷的譯文只是其中很小的一部分。
.........................................................................................

蔣介石殘殺楊、宋經過 口述人:沈醉  

此文僅代表作者觀點,作者文責自負(書架 書蟲)

http://www.epicbook.com/guest/argue.asp?motifID=2602


毛人鳳便下令先一天(約在一九四九年八月底九月初)派交通警察總隊一個中隊,把松林坡團團圍住,不讓任何人進入這個區域。

當楊所乘汽車第二天中午到達貴州和四川交界的松坎後,周養浩一看天色尚早,到重慶過輪渡時怕人看到,便勸楊在松坎小客棧內睡了一個午覺,一面通知重慶作好一切准備。下午四點,他們才由松坎出發,到重慶天已黑下來。毛人鳳已派楊進興准備好輪渡,等候他們過江,並隨車一同到松林坡。周養浩便回到中美所楊家山家中等消息。

楊等下車後,兩個特務攙扶著楊走上三百多級石階到戴公詞去。他的兒子楊拯中雙手捧著母親的骨灰盒,也被兩個特務夾持著一同上去。宋績云夫婦和楊、宋兩個孩子便被安置在汽車間附近的平房內,相距有三百多級石階。楊氏父子到達目的地,又被特務分別弓響左右兩邊的正房。這一切布置,使楊很感驚疑。特務們這時最怕這位二十多歲的楊公子會有所反抗,決定先解決他。當他剛一踏進室內,預伏在門後的特務便用利刃插入他的胸膛。他慘叫了一聲“爸”,正要掙紮,便被特務們連著几刀刺倒在地。楊虎城聽到兒子的叫聲,心知有異,在這山雨欲來風滿樓的慘景中,老先生(這是特務們對他一向的稱呼)愛子心切,想轉身去看個究竟,剛一掉頭,劊子手的利刃已刺進他的腹部。他大聲叫了一聲“喲”,痛極倒在地下。凶手將他們再補上几刀後,認為沒有問題了,便向山下奔去。

他們手握血淋淋的利刃,踏進宋綺云、徐林俠夫婦房內時,宋氏夫婦一看這副殺氣騰騰的凶象,知道難逃一死。宋夫人便向凶手們要求饒恕兩個孩子。沒有半點人性的凶手,一語不發,向他們身邊逼過去。這時,兩個八九歲的孩子剛剛下車,還正玩得起勁,一看這情況,便互相緊緊地摟抱在一起。當宋氏夫婦被逼到牆邊無路可走時,凶手們搶一步跳了過去,向他們劈胸几刀。這時,孩子們驚得呱的一聲哭了起來。凶手們一面用刀刺殺宋氏夫婦,一面厲聲向孩子們叫喊不准哭。孩子們嚇得把哭聲咽回去,摟抱得更緊了。滅絕人性的凶手把從大人身上的匕首拔出,又走向孩子。當第一個孩子被凶手從背上一刀刺穿到前胸時,另一個馬上撲上去抱住他。另一凶手便獰笑一聲,照樣給他一刀。這時,宋夫人尚未斷氣,但已發不出聲,她瞪著憤怒到極點的雙眼,緊緊地咬著牙齒,看著自己的兒子森森和他的小朋友被修殺。凶手們有意增加受難者臨死前的痛苦,最後又給宋夫人補上几刀。他們殺完以後,匆匆把六具屍體埋在附近,便向主子去報功。楊隨身攜帶的小皮箱中的財物也被他們當獎金結瓜分了。楊虎城將軍屍體的面部,還被特務淋上鏹水後,才埋在一座花台裏面。其余的屍體也埋在附近。

當時參加屠殺的凶手張鵲、張靜甫、陳寶琪等二十多人,以後都派到云南,由我另行分配工作。他們報到以後,每人都向我多次敘述這一過程,講述時都是以最得意的口吻,爭相誇耀自己的“成績”。事後毛人鳳向我談到此事時說:“老頭子(蔣介石)對于這件事幹得如此幹淨利落,很感滿意。”
紐約時報:蔣女士,請你把A美國的錢吐出來!!

「他們是賊,她們每一個人都是賊」,楚門指的是蔣宋 國民政府的領導人

紐約時報今天花了相當大的篇幅,回顧蔣宋美齡的一生(標題:蔣女士,105,中國領 導人的寡婦,死亡)非常值得注意的事,整篇文章,從開始到結尾都不斷強調一件事,就是蔣宋美齡A了美國的錢,也清楚提及美國人對蔣宋美齡幻滅(disillusion)的過程。台灣的統派媒體和政客只顧吹噓蔣宋美齡如何受到美國人愛戴,而隱藏美國人後來極端厭惡蔣宋美齡的事實,真是夠了。

因為篇幅太大,我僅就統派媒體不會提及的段落翻譯出來,上下文難免不接,翻譯不好,請海涵。

Yet histori ans have documented the murderous path that Chiang Kai-shek led
in his efforts to win, then keep, and ultimately lose power. It also became
clear in later years that the Chiang family had pocketed hundreds of
millions of dollars of American aid intended for the war.

但是歷史學家們紀錄了蔣介石以殘殺手腕,贏取,保有,最終失去權力的過程。後來幾年,事情變得明朗化,蔣氏家庭A了好幾億用來支援中國抗日和打共產黨戰爭的美援。

......

Although Madame Chiang developed a stellar image with the American public,
President Franklin D. Roosevelt and other leaders became disillusioned with
her and her husband's despotic and corrupt practices. Eleanor Roosevelt was
shocked at Madame Chiang's answer when asked at a dinner at the White House
how the Chinese Government would handle a strike by coal miners. Madame
Chiang silently drew a sharp fingernail across her neck.

"She can talk beautifully about democracy," Mrs. Roosevelt said later. "But
she does not know how to live democracy."

雖然蔣女士在美國的公眾輿論裡有一種明星般的形象,法蘭克福‧羅斯福總統和其它領袖們,逐漸因為她和她丈夫專制腐敗的作為,對蔣女士感到幻滅。Eleanor羅斯福女士在一場白宮晚餐中,當問到蔣女士中國政府要如何處理煤礦工人罷工問題的時感到驚恐:蔣女士不發一語,用尖銳的指甲在她的脖子前比了一比。

「她可以把民主談得很漂亮,但是她不知道如何生活在民主政治裡」羅斯福女士事後說。

......

By the end of the war, the loyalty of Nationalist officials melted away as
the Governmen t grew corrupt and fiscally traitorous, printing money so
aggressively that the Chinese currency fell to an exchange rate of several
million yuan to the dollar. Many Nationalist soldiers were reduced to
begging for food because they went unpaid, yet American diplomats discovered
that military supplies sent from the United States to China sometimes
appeared on the black market soon after arrival.

戰爭結束前夕,國民政府的官員們對政府的忠誠已消失殆盡。政府愈來愈貪婪,甚至在財政上叛國,貪得無厭的印鈔票,使得中國對美金的匯率跌到只剩好幾百萬分之一。許多國民政府的軍隊因沒有薪水而被迫乞討,但是美國外交官員們發現,從美國送去中國的軍事補給,有時在一抵達中國就出現在黑市上。

......

Even at the busiest times of war, Madame Chia ng often left her husband and
disappeared into seclusion in New York for months at a time. The Chiang camp
was too secretive to deny rumors about marital troubles, but Madame Chiang's
retreats may also have been caused by a debilitating skin condition.

即使在戰爭最吃緊的時刻,蔣女士也經常離開丈夫身邊,一下遁入紐約幾個月不見人影。蔣幫因為太神秘而無能反駁有關他們婚姻的謠言,但是蔣女士的自動消失,或許也肇因於她日益惡化的皮膚狀況。

......

Madame Chiang went out shopping in her limousine one afternoon, and did not return home by evening.

在上海時,那天蔣女士如常地坐著她的大型加長Limousine上街購物...(這段講到她和毒販頭子杜月笙的恩怨)

.....

Madame Chiang made a splash in Washington soon afterward. She spoke
forcefully and passionately to Congress, winning a roaring ovation. She then
traveled across the country, appearing at Madison Square Garden and at the
Hollywood Bowl.

But she earned the enmity of American G.I.'s when she returned to China's
wartime capital, Chungking, with several suitcases, one of which plopped
open to reveal luxurious cosmetics, lingerie and fancy groceries.

It was a small sign of the growing corruption within the Nationalists that
would speed their undoing.

蔣女士很快的在華府引起風潮,她在國會強有力和熱情的演說,引起了如雷的掌聲,她然後橫越整個國家,出現在麥迪遜花園廣場和好萊屋Bowl。

但是她同時卻引起了美國軍人對她的厭惡,尤其是她回到戰時的首都重慶,帶著許?h箱的皮箱,其中一個撐開來,露出了裡面奢華的化妝品,私人衣物和時髦昂貴的日用品。

這只是國民政府正迅速的走向自我毀滅,逐漸腐敗的小警訊。

......

Other American officials in China also warned against the vast amounts of
graft among Nationalists. More than $3 billion was appropriated to China
during the war, and most of it was transmitted through T.V. Soong, who as
China's foreign minister was based in Washington. It later became apparent
that the Soong family suffered vicious infighting over the purloined funds.

其他在中國的官美國員,也嚴厲警告國民政府大規模移花接木的腐敗行徑。美國在戰時,支援中國超過三十億美元,但是大多數都是宋子文經手,宋是中國住在華府的財政首長。後來事實顯示,宋家為了分贓這些A來的美援,搞得? a庭很不愉快。

......

Madame Chiang traveled to Washington again in November 1948 to plead for
emergency aid for the war against the Communists. Yet Congress had recently
assigned another $1 billion to China, and President Truman was impatient
with the Chiangs and what had become an apparently hopeless effort to shore
up the Nationalist Government. Madame Chiang never returned to China.

蔣女士在1948年十月到華府來要錢打共產黨,但是美國國會才通過對中國的十億援助,此時楚門總統對蔣家夫婦已經非常沒有耐心,給蔣家錢對於支持國民民政府根本沒有一點幫助。蔣女士從此沒有再回到中國。

"I can ask the American people for nothing more," she said. "It is either in
your hearts to love us, or your hearts have been turned from us."

蔣女士說: 「我不會在向美國人要什麼了,要不是你們愛我們,要不就是你們的心已背離了我們。」

In her frustration, she publicly likened American politics to 'clodhopping
boorishness." Coming after years of generous American support, that
irritated Truman.

挫折之下,她公開的將美國政界比喻成「愚蠢的野蠻」。美國多年來對蔣家這樣大方的支持,竟然換得這樣的評價,這激怒了楚門。

"They're thieves, every damn one of them," Mr. Truman said later, referring
to Nationalist leaders. "They stole $750 million out of the billions that we
sent to Chiang. They stole it, and it's invested in real estate down in SAao
Paolo and some right here i n New York."

「他們是賊,她們每一個人都是賊」,楚門指的是國民政府的領導人,「他們q我們送給蔣政府的上十億美金裡,偷取了將近七億五千萬美金。他們偷了這筆錢,而且將這筆 錢投資在巴西的聖保羅,以及就在這裡,紐約的房地產。」

........................................................

美國政府曾公開批評蔣宋家族,.呸,他們一家都是賊..

政治 | 2006-01-17 01:47:29

美國政府對於蔣宋家族A上十億美金的美援非常憤怒..
竟然出現有史以來美國總統 以政府名義 對國際 發出白皮書
譴責國民政府蔣宋家族呸!他們一家都是賊..的笑話.

美國政府曾公開批評蔣宋家族呸!他們一家都是賊..

其實..蔣宋家族,詐騙美國金援,許多國民黨人士搶劫強姦屠殺人民..
難怪..全中國人不惜犧牲生命,都要消滅殺死驅趕,貪汙腐敗黑金國民黨.
台灣人民就倒楣啦..收留這些人渣敗類,還要被搶劫強姦屠殺...
等這些人渣敗類,爽夠了又失去政權,現在竟然要出賣台灣向共匪邀功..
台灣人民,真是衰透了...

當年,A美國上十億美金的美援,現在應該價值千億美元..真是可怕...

=========

老師其實沒有錯..蔣經國的確清廉....呸!他們一家都是賊.

你有聽說過---皇帝貪汙的嗎?
獨裁者和皇帝都認為普天之下都是我的.
我高興拿什麼就拿什麼連你的命都是我掌握的..
天下都是=我家的..何來貪汙?

所以..蔣宋敗類..將國庫當成自己的存款簿..
把 錢 古董 國寶 不斷運到美國..
聽說..孔宋家族在美國有 可以防原子彈的地下城堡..
你說..厲害不厲害..

==========

國為什麼放棄 蔣介石 蔣宋美齡??

當年..蔣宋美齡 去找美國人幫忙
在美國國會演講..並且得到美國人的支持..
但是..後來..美國人發現他們的援助根本被蔣宋家族侵吞..
美國總統杜魯門還公開批 蔣宋家族是::小偷 .賊..

民國39年,,美國發表對中華民國白皮書...
對於蔣介石政權 貪汙腐敗黑金 表示失望
決定放棄 對中華民國的支持...
後來 支那共匪介入韓戰..使得美國回頭支持台灣..

蔣宋美齡根本只是會貪汙腐敗黑金而已
蔣宋美齡生活奢侈 脾氣大..珠寶滿箱子
去美國時 帶300箱子的寶物是蔣幫獨裁者 屠夫的幫凶..
到現在才死..真是造孽..

............................................................................

 雖然兩蔣已駕崩快20年,可是百萬蔣家徒子徒孫,仍在台法外亂政。
若陳家無恥,那么惡劣千百倍的蔣家呢?況且阿扁總統沒貪錢卻要做牢,

比起發國難財的蔣家(當年7.5億今天可能要上幾百億美元了)。

 

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彭淑禎

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留言列表 (11)

發表留言
  • 人
  • 寫份已不可考無從查證英文稿加上中文對照!就以為很專業嗎?我記得!白宮記者會都可以造假!
  • 悄悄話
  • ysi
  • 這麼多錢?在哪裡呢?
    這種沒有根據的文章,如何教人相信?
  • 訪客
  • 日本戰敗後經濟崩毀,不是國民黨的蔣介石搬黃金到台灣,今天會是怎樣的局面?
  • Nima
  • 杜魯門本來就是分裂中國的元兇,壞蛋一個!找個死人怎麼對質?這媒體是怎麼回事兒?台灣搞垮了大家沒活路,知道嗎?
  • 人人
  • 格主都附上網址了,這樣還說不可考無從查證就太令大家呵呵了.
  • Bit
  • 這麼多錢在哪裡應該要去問kmt吧。

    杜魯門是公開罵的,報社很多都有報導,出版社還出書,根據就是kmt不敢提告甚至當作沒這些事。
  • 教授
  • 蔣介石搬黃金到台灣卻多數沒用在台灣建設,
    而是花在養他的中國軍隊,而且沒多久就快花完了。

    後來韓戰爆發後恢復的美援,反而給台灣更多實在的幫助。
  • korea
  • 杜魯門不是分裂中國的元兇,
    分裂中國的元兇壞蛋有兩個!
    就是中國國民黨跟中國共產黨。

    死人雖難對質,但資料文獻&證據會說話

    如#7 Bit所言:報社很多都有報導,出版社還出書,kmt若非自知理虧,為何不去提告。

    杜魯門是等聯邦調查局進行調查後有了實證才開罵的,這些在美國都是眾所皆知的事實。

    台灣若被急統&盲統搞垮了,華人民主才真沒活路,知道嗎‧‧‧‧‧‧
  • 訪客
  • 人人都有過去,不要再耙糞了,不要再撕裂台灣了~
    因為孫悟空以前還不是隨地小便~
  • 華奴有夠多
  • 真多奴家思想的人,對於某些人,你就算把證據放他眼前,他仍可以為了自我心中的“信仰”視而不見充耳不聞,說多就說他人搞對立,意欲撕裂台灣,好像台灣像衛生紙般脆弱似的,真是笑話。看看德國是怎麼接受歷史錯誤與修正自我,今日國家體系發展才如此健全完整,無法正視自我錯誤的人(政黨),怎麼能夠引領國家走向新局面?「蔣家政權已落幕數十年,台灣笨蛋卻能繼續遺毒台灣數十年。」
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